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Democrats are campaigning on the hurdle of the Senate filibuster to any national abortion bill

Former Rep. Debbie Mucarsel-Powell (Via Daniel Burry/Getty Images)

Senator Tammy Baldwin, who is up for reelection in a critical race for Congress, has centered her campaign on defending reproductive rights. She’s willing to adjust Senate rules on filibustering if Democrats keep their Senate majority. Baldwin argues this change is needed so that women, not the government, can choose whether to have an abortion.

She warns that if Republicans win in November, they might also target the filibuster to enforce a nationwide ban on abortion. Baldwin accuses Republicans of consistently trying to control women’s reproductive choices.

Many Democratic candidates for Senate this year want to restore abortion rights nationally and support altering the filibuster rules, similar to Baldwin’s stance. This has become a major talking point amid the ongoing national debate over abortion rights, which has generally favored Democratic candidates since the Supreme Court’s recent decision.

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, speaks (Via Daniel Burry/Getty Images)

Republicans criticize Democrats for wanting to change the rules and insist they wouldn’t do so if they win the presidency and Senate.

Senators Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski, both Republicans who support abortion rights, have proposed legislation to solidify protections established by Roe v. Wade. Collins vows to oppose any attempt to weaken the legislative filibuster by either party.

Current Senate rules require 60 votes to end debate on a bill, effectively making it the minimum number needed to pass legislation and serving as a check on the majority. This rule has hindered both parties in passing laws on issues like voting rights and immigration amid political division.

However, the Senate majority can change these rules and create exceptions to the filibuster with a simple majority vote, known as the “nuclear option,” though this has been rarely used.

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